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Chinese media calls India's visa policy 'a pain in the butt'

Global Times said in one of its article at the time that the allegations were all false

Policy Pulse
Publish Date: Aug 9 2016 12:32PM | Updated Date: Aug 9 2016 12:32PM

Chinese media calls India's visa policy  'a pain in the butt'

 Even though India has stopped talking about it, but China's media is continuing to discuss on about India not getting into the Nuclear Suppliers Group.

 
It is saying that India is therefore taking "revenge" on Beijing,  by being "petty" and by making its business visa policy "a pain in the butt."
 
"Pain in the butt" are the exact words used in Global Times's latest attack against India.
 
"Although news about India's latest reform on GST galvanized waves of optimism among business communities across China, for Chinese nationals, a business visa to India remains a pain in the butt," the article in the state-run news agency said.
 
It also said that India is exerting its visa policy as a "weapon", which is "not only petty, but may even backfire severely" on its own long-term interests. And India's doing this since it sees China as the "culprit" that blocked its entry into the elite nuclear club, the Chinese news agency added.
 
Recently, India had refused to renew the visas of three Chinese media persons, who worked for the Xinhua.
 
Indian government intelligence officials said this was because the so called journalists were under a suspicion s they were using fake names to get into sensitive areas and to speak  to high-level government personnel.
 
Global Times said in one of its article at the time that the allegations were all false. 
 
In its latest article it said India was just using that as an excuse to hit back at Beijing over its non-support of India's Nuclear Suppliers Group. (NSG) mebership.
 
"Unlike non-work tourism visas that can be issued promptly via the e-visa system, most other types of visa must go through the tedious process. Just like the 'sensitive' journalist visa, business visas also require approval from Indian Ministry of Home Affairs on a case-by-case basis," wrote Global Times.