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This gadget can make you happy

It can make you have more willpower, think more, says a review in a newspaper

Policy Pulse
Publish Date: Apr 17 2016 6:24PM | Updated Date: Apr 17 2016 6:30PM

This gadget can make you happy

Forget all the other devices that check your health.  Latest thing is a gadget that is wearable and change your mood.

 
"These gadgets claim to be able to make you have more willpower, think more creatively and even jump higher. One day , their makers say , the technology may even succeed in del’.
 
“This is not some new-age nutjobbery, though. There seems to be real science behind these devices. It involves stimulating key regions of the brain -with currents or magnetic fields -to affect emotions and physical well-being. It isn't too different from how electroshock therapy works to counter certain mental illnesses and how deep-brain stimulation smooths motion disorders such as multiple sclerosis and Parkinson's disease. "Indeed, recent studies have looked at the technique as a possible treatment for stroke, autism and anorexia," writes Cha.
 
Nonetheless using electrical currents to change behaviour of brains sounds dangerous and neuroscientists are rightly worried.
 
According to Kevin Zaghloul, a brain scientist, even if the devices work as predicted, there are also apprehensions about how they account for individual variability in brain structure and whether improving one area of the brain could damagingly affect another. Other scientists are even more concerned, doubting if repeated usage can lead to overdose-like situations. And what happens if these devices become defective or are sabotaged? Very obviously, no one really knows the long-term consequences of using them.
 
These devices work through something called "transcranial directcurrent stimulation". They send weak electrical tides that jolt neurons, which can increase or decrease the release of certain chemicals that can change person’s feeling.