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India and other nations pull out of SAARC summit

Three other members - Bangladesh, Afghanistan and Bhutan - have also pulled them self out of the meet

Policy Pulse
Publish Date: Sep 28 2016 9:58AM | Updated Date: Sep 28 2016 11:59AM

India and other nations pull out of SAARC summit

After Prime Minister Narendra Modi decided that he will not travel to Pakistan for the regional SAARC summit in November, three other members - Bangladesh, Afghanistan and Bhutan - have also pulled them self out of the meet.

 

SAARC or South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation summit was scheduled for November 2016 in Islamabad. PM Modi distant himself from Pakistan in view of recent terrorist attack in Uri which even creates tension in UN general assembly meet.

 

Sources said that Bangladesh in its communication to the current chair of SAARC said, "The growing interference in the internal affairs of Bangladesh by one country has created an environment which is not conducive to the successful hosting of the 19th SAARC Summit in Islamabad."

 

It adds, "Bangladesh, as the initiator of the SAARC process, remains steadfast in its commitment to regional cooperation, connectivity and contacts but believes that these can only go forward in a more congenial atmosphere. In view of the above, Bangladesh is unable to participate in the proposed Summit in Islamabad."

 

Sources said Afghanistan and Bhutan has cited similar reasons for pulling out of the summit, which cannot take place even if one country withdraws.

 

The Indian government has blamed cross-border terror attacks for creating an environment that is not conducive for the meeting. Its decision not to attend the summit is so far the biggest in India's global campaign to isolate Pakistan after four terrorists crossed the border into Kashmir and attacked an army base in Uri. 18 soldiers were killed.

 

In recent days, PM Modi has made a series of other moves to penalise Pakistan. He has reviewed the crucial Indus Waters Treaty, which divides resources from six rivers between India and Pakistan, saying "blood and water can't flow together."