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Thailand eliminates mother to child HIV Transmission

Thailand is the first Asian Country to do so with 90 percent less cases of mother to child HIV transmission

Policy Pulse
Publish Date: Jun 8 2016 2:58PM | Updated Date: Jun 8 2016 2:58PM

Thailand eliminates mother to child HIV Transmission
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The World Health Organisation (WHO) declared Thailand to be the first Asian Country to eradicate mother to child transmission of HIV and syphilis, on Wednesday.
 
Around 21,000 HIV-positive children are born annually in Asia Pacific, which is also home to roughly 200,000 affected minors.
 
According to the WHO, an HIV-infected woman has a 15-45 per cent risk of transmitting the virus to her children during pregnancy, labour or breastfeeding, but the risk drops to 1 per cent if she receives antiretroviral drugs during these periods.
 
Thailand's Ministry of Health noted that now 98 per cent of HIV-infected women have access to antiretroviral drugs and the rate of mother-to-child HIV transmission has fallen below 2 per cent.
 
In the year 2000, approximately 1,000 children were infected with HIV and significantly the number has diminished by 90 percent in 2015 where only 85 new child cases with HIV were registered. 
 
In addition to that, the rate of mother-to-child HIV transmission, the number of HIV-infected women has also fallen from 15,000 new cases annually in 2000 to 1,900 in 2014 - an 87 per cent reduction in less than two decades.