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Climate change poses threat for primates

Researchers measures exposure and potential susceptibility of all non-human primate species

Policy Pulse
Publish Date: Aug 11 2016 3:42PM | Updated Date: Aug 11 2016 3:42PM

Climate change poses threat for primates

Climate change may pose a grave challenge for survival of the world's primate populations, including monkeys, apes and lemurs, mainly in Central America, the Amazon and southeastern Brazil, as well as portions of East and Southeast Asia, a study has said.

 
"Our study suggests that climate change may be one of the biggest emerging threats to primates, fighting existing pressures from hunting, deforestation and the exotic pet trade," said lead author Tanya Graham from Concordia University in Montreal, Canada.
 
Researchers measured the exposure and potential susceptibility of all non-human primate species to projected future temperature and precipitation changes. 
 
They found that in general, 419 species of non-human primates, such as numerous species of lemurs, tarsiers, monkeys and apes -- will experience 10 per cent more warming than the global average, with some primate species experiencing increases of more than 1.5 degrees celsius in annual average temperature for every degree of global warming.
 
Researchers also found several hotspots of primate weakness to climate change, based on the combination of the number of species, their endangered status and the severity of climate changes at different locations.