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4.5 foot long Cobra rescued from Delhi farmhouse

Habitat encroachment and wilderness loss causing wild animals to enter in the urban areas

Mugdha Singh
Publish Date: Jul 19 2016 3:11PM | Updated Date: Jul 19 2016 4:39PM

4.5 foot long Cobra rescued from Delhi farmhouse

The Wildlife SOS NGO rescued a 4.5 foot long cobra snake from a farmhouse in Dera Mandi, near Chhatarpur, New Delhi. The snake is currently kept under observation and will soon be released back into its natural habitat.

 
People from Dera Mandi location alerted the Wildlife SOS Rapid Response Unit and informed about a cobra that was wandering in the premises of a farmhouse. They were in a bit of shock to discover the large snake in their house.
 
A two member rescue team was promptly dispatched to the location and upon arrival requested the family members and staff to clear the area so as to maintain a safe distance from the venomous snake and to avoid any unnecessary conflicts. 
 
“The rescue was carried out safely and the snake is currently kept under observation. It will be released back into the wild, once deemed fit,” Suvidha Bhatnagar, Communication Office of the NGO, told Policy Pulse.
 
Dipak Marwa, who placed the call said, “At first we spotted the cobra outside near the garden but it soon made its way into the guard room. As our farmhouse is located near a forested area, we have come across similar cases in the past and have always contacted Wildlife SOS for their assistance.”
 
Geeta Seshamani, Co-founder of Wildlife SOS said “Cobras seldom bite, but will give out a warning sign by displaying their hood. When dealing with venomous snakes, it is important to keep them very calm and avoid cornering it or causing it to panic.”
 
Dr AK Sinha, an expert of wildlife behaviour shared the reasons of human and animal conflicts with Policy Pulse. Dr Sinha claims that rapid habitat encroachment and wilderness loss causing wild animals to enter in the urban areas.
 
“Unplanned development is the reason because of which animals either forced to remain in small green pockets or enter in the urban areas. Solution could be maintenance of green corridors and forest patches,” he added.