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Juvenile snake rescued by NGO from Metro platform

Presence of snake causes panic amongst commuters at the Dwarka Sector -21 Metro Station

Mugdha Singh
Publish Date: Jul 14 2016 2:39PM | Updated Date: Jul 14 2016 2:46PM

Juvenile snake rescued by NGO from Metro platform

A juvenile Common Kukri snake was rescued by the Wildlife SOS Rapid Response Unit from Dwarka Metro Station, New Delhi. The snake is currently kept under observation and will be released into its natural habitat once deemed fit.

 

The presence of a rather unusual passenger on the metro platform spread panic amongst commuters at the Dwarka Sector -21 Metro Station, New Delhi. Startled by the sight of a snake in the premises, the Delhi Metro Rail Corporation (DMRC) authorities alert the Wildlife SOS Rapid Response Unit.

 

A two member rescue team was promptly dispatched to the location and upon arrival, identified the snake as a juvenile common kukri (Oligodon arnensis) also known as the banded kukri.

 

It is a non-venomous colubrid snake found in the Indian subcontinent and is protected under the Wildlife Protection Act, 1972.

 

A member of the Wildlife SOS rescue unit said, “By the time we reached the location, a crowd of curious on-lookers had gathered around the platform. Taking care not to harm or startle it, we carefully removed the snake and managed to carefully lure it into a transport container."

 

Kartick Satyanarayan, Co-founder of Wildlife SOS, said, “Kukris are non-venomous snakes, but are often mistaken for the highly venomous common krait which it closely resembles. This particular species preys on insects, larvae, reptile eggs, small rodents and skinks.

 

The Kukri gets its name because of its sharp, curved teeth that resembles a ‘kukri knife’ that is used for slicing reptile eggs. The snake is under observation and will be reintroduced to its natural habitat once deemed fit for release.