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No tigers left in Cambodia

Indo-chinese tigers who were once Cambodia’s valor, no more exist due to intensive poaching

Policy Pulse
Publish Date: May 2 2016 4:57PM | Updated Date: May 2 2016 4:57PM

No tigers left in Cambodia

 Tigers are declared extinct in Cambodia as reported by 'The Guardian'.  The conservationists last week declared tigers to be “functionally extinct” as they make plan to reintroduce big cats to the forests of Cambodia.  

 
Indo-chinese tigers who were once Cambodia’s valor, no more exist due to intensive poaching and hunting. 
 
The last tiger was seen on camera trap in the eastern Mondulkiri province in 2007, according to the report.
 
In order to reintroduce tigers to the Mondulkiri protected forest in the far of east the country, the Cambodian government is planning to strengthen the laws against poaching and hunting of the endangered species, especially tigers.
 
But before the enactment of this law, there is a need to make the arrangements for the breeding of these tigers. So, for that, the government has planned to take help of two male and six female tigers. 
 
For the plan to get successful, the government needs $20 to $50m for the project. The government had already begun talks with countries including India, Thailand and Malaysia to provide a small number of wild tigers.